Hacked Gadgets Forum

October 5, 2014

Making of an Arduino

at 7:10 pm. Filed under Educational

Making of an Arduino

 

This video by designboom gives us a glimpse into the making of an Arduino PCB. Arduino boards are still produced in Italy! You can see an interesting picture (last one at the bottom) which shows an arduino in a programming and test fixture. I am quite surprised to see that they are programmed individually, I would have though there might have been either a large program and test system which would have done a panel at a time or an automated line where they were just fed in one end and came out the other end with a pass or fail indication.

“who would ever imagine that global cultural and economic revolution would spring from the tranquil fields of piedmont, italy, in tiny towns nestled against the stunning backdrop of the alps? but that’s exactly where arduino, the system of microcontrollers revolutionzing the maker movement and pioneering the concept of opensource hardware, was born in 2005 and continues to make its home today.”

 

 

Making of an Arduino_2

 

Making of an Arduino_3

 


Plot Clock

at 11:57 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This is a cool plot clock made by Francisco Ramos Muñoz. It uses 3 mini servo motors, one to move the draw/erase mechanism up and down and two to move the print location. The lines are nice and straight so we can tell that some kinematic techniques have been employed here. The system is being controlled using an Arduino microcontroller and is sure entertaining to watch. If you are interested in making your own you can find the instructions here.

 


October 3, 2014

Fostex FE206En Back-Loaded Horn Loudspeakers

at 11:57 pm. Filed under Insane Equipment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Check out this crazy internal baffle structure of this cool Fostex FE206En Back-Loaded Horn Loudspeaker.

 “The back-loaded or rear-loaded horn loudspeaker system is like bass-reflex and double bass-reflex speaker types in that the sound radiated from the back of speaker transducer is utilized to enhance the bass response. The difference however is that back-loaded horn (BLH) speaker enclosures make among the most efficient use of the back wave from the speaker driver. The back-loaded horn speaker enclosure operates by developing the bass response using the back wave from the speaker driver and an expanding horn section. The remainder of sound spectrum (mid and high-frequency ranges) is radiated directly from the front wave produced by the speaker driver. Back-loaded horn speaker enclosures are generally amongst the most efficient enclosure systems and respond well to the subtlest components of music signals. For “tighter” sound reproduction, you can reduce the interior volume of the horn speaker cabinet using fill material. Sound absorbing material should be used directly behind the driver and also at the mouth of the horn to smooth out the frequency response.”

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


October 2, 2014

Etch a Sketch Clock

at 5:49 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This Etch a Sketch Clock is a great use of an old toy!

“I use an Arduino driving two very cheap darlington stepper drivers with 64:1 internally reduced steppers for the drawing. For the rotation I’m using an Easy-Driver driving a Nema 17 stepper.

I also have a DS1307RTC real time clock installed so it always knows the time. Setting the time is a one-off via USB connected to a PC. Once done, you un-tether, and then the RTC keeps the time, for up to a year on the rechargeable battery, or so I’m told…”

 

October 1, 2014

Kevin Mitnick selling Zero-Day Exploits, starting at $100K

at 11:38 pm. Filed under Other

kevin_mitnick

 

Kevin Mitnick has had a long life of ups and downs. He was hunted and jailed by the FBI for his hacking antics. Up until recently I would have considered him to be a trusted white hat hacker. His Mitnick Security company specialized in Pen testing. Now Kevin will be selling Zero-Day Exploits. This is a sad day.

The video below covers much of the Kevin story.\

Late last week, Mitnick revealed a new branch of his security consultancy business he calls Mitnick’s Absolute Zero Day Exploit Exchange. Since its quiet inception six months ago, he says the service has offered to sell corporate and government clients high-end “zero-day” exploits, hacking tools that take advantage of secret bugs in software for which no patch yet exists. Mitnick says he’s offering exploits developed both by his own in-house researchers and by outside hackers, guaranteed to be exclusive and priced at no less than $100,000 each, including his own fee.

 


September 29, 2014

Bitx20 V3 Dead Bug Style Bandpass Filter

at 11:21 pm. Filed under DIY Hacks

 Bitx20 V3 Dead Bug Style Bandpass Filter

 

Check out this Dead Bug Style Bandpass Filter design by PA1ED. If you want great noise isolation a metal box is ideal, check out his FR4 box design! Great idea using FR4 for the PCBs and for the case.

 “Because I don`t have a spectrum analyzer,I was not able to test it if the Bandpass filter was doing a good job on the frequency it was designed for.So I took out the earlier filter and put the new filter in my Bitx 20 V3.After I made the connections,I put the power and a antenna on the Bitx.And guess what.I didn`t hear anything,only noise.After a turn on one of the 20pf variable capacitors the stations where comming thru.I searched for a weak station and began to turn the three variable caps so that the incoming station was on his best.”

Via: Dangerous Prototypes and Soldersmoke

 

 

 

Bitx20 V3 Dead Bug Style Bandpass Filter_2

September 28, 2014

Name the Thing Contest – 259

at 12:33 pm. Filed under Contests

 guess_this_259

 

The prize this week is a Mifare RC522 RFID Card Reader. This contest will run for one week (September 28 – October 3, 2014). Ending time is based on central standard time. To enter, identify the item above and what it can be used for. Please note the image above is a side view of the thing.

Please do not give the answer in the comments.

Send an email to contest @ hackedgadgets.com with “Name the Thing Contest” as the subject, and the message body consisting of:

  • The name of the item in the above picture
  • An example of what the item pictured above can be used for

The winner will be chosen at random from all of the correct entries.

Below is a picture of the prize.

 

Mifare RC522 Card Read Antenna RF Module RFID Reader IC Card Proximity Module

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