Hacked Gadgets Forum

November 6, 2014

EWaste 3DPrinter

at 10:53 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

EWaste 3DPrinter

 

If you think the price of 3D printers is hitting the floor check out what built for $60. About 80% of this EWaste 3DPrinter is recycled computer parts which is abundant and readily available.

“First of all, we learn how a generic CNC system works (by assembling and calibrating bearings, guides and threads) and then teach the machine to respond to g-code instructions. After that, we add a small plastic extruder and give an overview on plastic extrusion calibration, driver power tuning and other few operations that will bring the printer to life. Following this instructions you will get a small footprint 3D Printer that is built with about an 80% of recycled components, which gives it a great potential and helps to reduce the cost significantly.”

 


October 19, 2014

Free Fun Flexible Watch

at 10:55 am. Filed under DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 Free Fun Flexible Watch 

 

Check out the F*watch! It is a Free Fun Flexible Watch design by a team of 15 people with various backgrounds, the watch is a challenging project since in the end it can’t be the size of a lunch box, can’t weigh a pound and can’t be plugged into the wall for power. All of the electronics fit into a tiny printed housing and looks very functional.  Check out the items that are stuffed inside listed below.

“F*watch is a fully open electronic watch project featuring an integrated GPS receiver. The development started at CERN as an after-work project to make a special present for a retiring colleague who likes hiking and timing. The full design (electronics, mechanics and software) is available under free licenses and the design is exclusively made with free tools.

  • Sensors
    • GPS
    • Pressure sensor
    • 3D-accelerometer
    • Compass
    • Ambient light sensor
  • I/O
    • 128×128 pixels LCD with backlight
    • Micro-USB connector, 4 Buttons
    • Buzzer, vibrating motor
    • MicroSD memory slot
  • Various
    • 500 mAh Lithium-ion battery, fuel gauge
    • 4-layer PCB”

 

 

Free Fun Flexible Watch_3

 

\Free Fun Flexible Watch_2


October 16, 2014

DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project

at 1:46 am. Filed under DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project

 

Our friends over at Electro Labs has a new project out, it is a DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project. As usual it is a start to finish project that has full details so you can build your own.

“This is an audio power amplifier based on LM1876 which can deliver up to 20W per channel into 4 or 8 ohm load and guarantees less than 0.1% THD + N (Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise).

The amplifier is powered by -15 0 15 VAC symmetrical supply. The full bridge diode rectifier and the smoothing capacitors convert the AC input to ±21 VDC which is used to power LM1876. The inductors on the AC input line reduces the noise arising from the mains line.”


October 7, 2014

Acoustic Impulse Marker

at 4:11 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

Acoustic Impulse Marker

 

This Acoustic Impulse Marker project by Adam Wrobel and Michael Grisanti of Cornell University uses 3 microphones to listen for sharp sounds, when a sound is detected the arrival time of the sound to each of the 3 microphones is used to determine where the sound came from. The project uses a ATmega 1284p microcontroller to process the microphone input but analog stages are used to convert a fast rising edge noise into a digital input for the microcontroller to work with easier.

“The core of our system is hardware based analog circuit, which filters, amplifies, and processes the sounds obtained from the microphones. By utilizing hardware for this, we are able to high frequency signal processing without taxing the microcontroller. Also, we remove the need to use the relatively slow ADC of the microcontroller by processing all the analog signals in hardware and converting them to binary digital pulses. However, the main tradeoff here is that the analog hardware limited our accuracy in a way that is very difficult to measure. Every stage of the circuit has real world inefficiencies and tolerances, which could accumulate in minute error. No matter how fast or thorough our software system is, it can only work with the values received from the analog hardware.”

 

October 5, 2014

Plot Clock

at 11:57 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This is a cool plot clock made by Francisco Ramos Muñoz. It uses 3 mini servo motors, one to move the draw/erase mechanism up and down and two to move the print location. The lines are nice and straight so we can tell that some kinematic techniques have been employed here. The system is being controlled using an Arduino microcontroller and is sure entertaining to watch. If you are interested in making your own you can find the instructions here.

 


October 2, 2014

Etch a Sketch Clock

at 5:49 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This Etch a Sketch Clock is a great use of an old toy!

“I use an Arduino driving two very cheap darlington stepper drivers with 64:1 internally reduced steppers for the drawing. For the rotation I’m using an Easy-Driver driving a Nema 17 stepper.

I also have a DS1307RTC real time clock installed so it always knows the time. Setting the time is a one-off via USB connected to a PC. Once done, you un-tether, and then the RTC keeps the time, for up to a year on the rechargeable battery, or so I’m told…”

 

September 27, 2014

Murata Cheerleaders

at 1:56 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks, Insane Equipment

 murata_cheerleaders

 

Murata is always pushing the envelope when it comes to demonstrating their technology in action. You probably remember the close up look we got of the technology behind Murata Girl and Murata Boy. This time they have made an entire group of robotic cheerleaders who dance in formation. They sit on top of a ball and balance as they are moving around. We have seen balancing ball robots before but the complexity of moving all of these balancing robots in unison must be quite challenging.

You need to see them in action. Click here to see the video, scroll down to see how the technology comes together.

Thanks to Amy from Murata for the info.

 

 

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