Hacked Gadgets Forum

January 13, 2017

Gesture Controlled Lamp powered by Raspberry Pi

at 12:06 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

 

This Gesture Controlled Lamp is powered by Raspberry Pi. An infrared camera is connected to the Raspberry Pi allowing the system to monitor for wand movements since the wand has an IR LED build into it. OpenCV is used to decipher the wand movements. There are a few simple gestures that are recognized to magically control the light.

Via: Make

“After a recent trip to Universal’s Wizarding World of Harry Potter, my daughters and I decided to create a project that could use the interactive wands from the theme park, at home, to control our own props and gadgets. We called it Raspberry Potter because it was powered with a Raspberry Pi. We demonstrated the project last year at the Minneapolis/St. Paul Mini Maker Faire and this article — Ollivander’s Lamp — is the latest extension of that project.”

 


December 20, 2016

Raspberry Pi Zero Ambient Lighting using Hyperion

at 10:29 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 

If you want to jazz up your tv with an Ambilight system now might be the time. We have seen other systems in the past that were impressive but not as good as this system. This new system is still a bit kludgy but seems to work very well and is nice and flexible to work with most systems. The Raspberry Pi Zero running Hyperion is the heart of the system and allows for lots of customization. The basics of this system takes in your TV HDMI signal into a splitter, one feed goes directly to your TV and the other goes into the an HDMI to AV converter. This AV signal is then fed into an AV to USB converter. The converter is plugged into a USB port of the Pi. This is not an ideal chain but since HDMI is a secure transport of video data there is no simple way for the Pi to read in the HDMI data. Now that the Hyperion software running on the Pi can see the live video signal that the TV is displaying it can calculate and output the appropriate codes that are fired down the serial LED string. Using the serial LED tape allows for a very simple LED layout.

 

 


December 12, 2016

Super Secure 4 Factor Lock Box Project

at 10:08 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 

 

 

Adarsh Jayakumar, Timon Amirani and Cameron Boroumand developed a Super Secure 4 Factor Lock Box Project for their Cornell University ECE 4760 final project. It uses a typed code, 3 pots set to a specific value, a knock sensor and a finger printer sensor. All they need now is a iris scan! Of course this box is built out of something that can be smashed into with ease and the electronics take up almost all the space in the box but just imagine this built into your steel and concrete reinforced safe room in your home.

 

 

 

 

 

 


December 5, 2016

Micro SD Card Data Recovery

at 9:34 pm. Filed under Electronic Hacks

 

Ever wonder how data recovery is done when an micro SD card fails? HDD Recovery Services shows us how he recovered the data. He uses 800 grit sand paper and wet sands the card till the card PCB pads are showing. He then micro solders wires from a memory reader directly to the SD card PCB. He is then able to pull the NAND flash data and save it locally. Not sure what he charges but based on the work that goes into getting it done it won’t be cheap.

 

November 19, 2016

Vintage Camera Raspberry Pi Hack

at 9:41 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

Tinkernut took a vintage camera and smoshed it together with some mini technology to re purpose it. A Raspberry Pi, camera module, WIFI module and screen is used as the wireless camera. The completed system sends each captured picture to the cloud. The code is very basic but turns this device into a robust IOT device that is fully functional.

 


October 31, 2016

Yamaha AV Receiver Teardown and Troubleshooting

at 9:22 pm. Filed under Electronic Hacks

 

 

The Post Apocalyptic Inventor got his hands on some cheap Yamaha audio gear. He took apart the receiver with the hopes to troubleshoot and repair the unit. Unfortunately a cap had spilled it’s guts and leaked all over the PCB corroding it very badly. It would be possible to repair but it would take a long time. If that wasn’t bad enough many of the main high power (expensive) parts were also damaged.

October 28, 2016

DIY Cheap CNC Machine using DVD Drives

at 10:39 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

If you are looking for a project build that can probably be put together with some items out of your junk box and about $10 in parts. The main drive for the system are the motor units from 2 old DVD drives. An Arduino controls the system.

“components used
1. 2x old PC DVD Writer
2. Arduino nano
3. Small servo motor
4. L293D
5. Zero PCB”

 

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