Hacked Gadgets Forum

December 21, 2014

Bed of Nails Tests Jig

at 10:52 am. Filed under DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

Bed of Nails Tests Jig

 

If you have a bunch of boards to program and test you have probably thought to automate some of the steps. Wiring all the connectors, hooking it up to a computer, programming in test firmware, running the system through a battery of tests and finally programming in the release firmware can be a tedious task. shows us how he made a test jig that is connected to a computer that easily runs through a number of automated steps to test his 3D printer boards.

 


December 13, 2014

Internet Controlled Robots

at 2:34 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 Internet Controlled Robots_2

 

These Internet Controlled Robots are not available to play with all the time but if you keep an eye on the Twitter channel you will have a chance to have a look and give them a try when they are online next.

“I only put together one robot kit previously, then these two robots both started as Activity Bots.
I hooked up a Raspberry Pi with an HD camera, went through a few wifi options, and got the robot to stream video to twitch.tv and take commands from users via their chat. Later i added the Aruduino for using neopixels and some other future features. We’ve also been making dungeons around the house, made out of cardboard, making quests, and other things for people to do and explore.”

 

Internet Controlled Robots


November 25, 2014

Sunshine Alarm Clock

at 10:42 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

Sunshine Alarm Clock

 

Martin built this Sunshine Alarm Clock in short time out of need. It is for his child but I think a brighter version of this slowly waking me up in the morning would be a nice change to the loud buzz from the alarm clock. All of the code and build details are here so you can make one for yourself.

“After I left our childs alarm clock at the grandparents one weekend I had to scrape together the parts to recreate the clock before he would go to sleep that evening. Thankfully I had a Neopixel ring and an RTC chip nearby so with an Arduino to patch it all together I managed to improvise a child’s sunshine alarm clock.”


November 24, 2014

Color Tracking Hexapod

at 1:38 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

Check out this Color Tracking Hexapod by in the Robot Shop Forum. The thing is a bit creepy! Not sure if there is a difference in programming but to me the first video looks like something trying to corner some prey and the second is more like a dog excited and ready to go running for a thrown ball. Nice job David.

“I am using the Pixy Cam to detect a pink object, in this case a pen cap, and move the body accordingly. All the PS2 controller functions work exactly as you’d expect; to enter tracking mode I press the triangle button. I am using a micro atmega 328 to connect and calculate the pan/tilt error of the object we are interested in. The height of the object is also obtained and used to determine how far away the object is.”

 

November 18, 2014

Self-Balancing Raleigh Chopper

at 3:36 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 Self-balancing Raleigh Chopper

 

It isn’t a simply task to make a self balancing anything. But if you are thinking of taking on the challenge has documented his design details for this Self-Balancing Raleigh Chopper that could give you a head start.

 

“Data from the IMU is read by the Arduino Mega 1280. I use a Mega 1280 because they are a lot cheaper online than the 2560, and about the same price as an Uno. They have several hard wired serial outputs which means I can conveniently use one of these to send motor control data to the Sabertooth 2 x 25 Amp power controller, and another to send data to the serial-LCD screen. The Deadman switch and steering buttons (actually brake levers from children’s e-scooters) when pressed will connect their respective Mega pins to ground. The deadman is for safety, if you let go of it all power to the motors will stop after half a second. Digital Pin 12 is connected to an LED. This LED stays lit on startup and goes out after a few seconds when the machine is ready to be brought “level” at which point it will start to balance itself. The potentiometer in the diagram is actually on the left handlebar and is a Magura 5K potentiometer “twist-grip” throttle handle designed for electric vehicles. Turning it makes the machine lean forwards a little, and so it starts to roll forwards. Let it spring back and machine will lean backwards a little and slow down. It makes a very effective method of controlling speed (as well as simply leaning like you would on a Segway).”

 


November 16, 2014

The Combinator – A Comparator Combination Safe

at 8:40 am. Filed under Electronic Hacks

The Combinator - A Comparator Combination Safe 

 

If you have some valuables that you need to keep safe you lock them in your safe (as the name implies). It probably has a dial that is used to dial in your secret combination. The Combinator is A Comparator Combination Safe just to spice things up a bit. You won’t find a microcontroller in this device even though it is an electronic safe, instead it uses all analog electronics to get the job done.

November 15, 2014

Shoulder Mounted Arduino Controlled Skull

at 10:34 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

Shoulder Mounted Arduino Controlled Skull

 

Steven from Rimstar.org built an interesting spooky Halloween skull to scare anyone who walks by. The video below goes through the construction details.

“Two heads on a body are scarier than one so for halloween I mounted an Arduino controlled skull on my shoulder with the electronics in a backpack and a hand controller hidden in my hand with the cable running down my sleeve. The jaw opens, the eyes light up and it makes a scary sound.

The biggest issue I ran into was getting a sound synthesis that could be done by the Arduino while still using a servo. Most sound libraries I found either conflicted with the servo library or required use of an abstraction layer.

Luckily the Arduino comes with a tone() function that uses simple PWM to make an 8-bit type sound that did the job while not conflicting the the servo library.”

 

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