Hacked Gadgets Forum

October 23, 2014

Can Crusher Project Build

at 1:12 pm. Filed under DIY Hacks

 

If you need to crush a bunch of aluminum cans you might as well build a machine to do it. That is what we see on the Ben Heck Show here. After Ben bent through a bunch of design submissions a cool design was selected. A single stepper motor crushes a can with a 30 to one gear reduction it can crush the can but isn’t able to crush the can completely. Not that the final design is ready for production but the design steps are very interesting.

 


October 19, 2014

Free Fun Flexible Watch

at 10:55 am. Filed under DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 Free Fun Flexible Watch 

 

Check out the F*watch! It is a Free Fun Flexible Watch design by a team of 15 people with various backgrounds, the watch is a challenging project since in the end it can’t be the size of a lunch box, can’t weigh a pound and can’t be plugged into the wall for power. All of the electronics fit into a tiny printed housing and looks very functional.  Check out the items that are stuffed inside listed below.

“F*watch is a fully open electronic watch project featuring an integrated GPS receiver. The development started at CERN as an after-work project to make a special present for a retiring colleague who likes hiking and timing. The full design (electronics, mechanics and software) is available under free licenses and the design is exclusively made with free tools.

  • Sensors
    • GPS
    • Pressure sensor
    • 3D-accelerometer
    • Compass
    • Ambient light sensor
  • I/O
    • 128×128 pixels LCD with backlight
    • Micro-USB connector, 4 Buttons
    • Buzzer, vibrating motor
    • MicroSD memory slot
  • Various
    • 500 mAh Lithium-ion battery, fuel gauge
    • 4-layer PCB”

 

 

Free Fun Flexible Watch_3

 

\Free Fun Flexible Watch_2


October 17, 2014

Capacitive Fluid Level Sensor

at 11:28 pm. Filed under DIY Hacks

Capacitive Fluid Level Sensor

 

If you need to determine the level of fluid you might think of some type of float switch system like what is typically used in a sump pit or a toilet tank. This Capacitive Fluid Level Sensor by uses a capacitive effect of the fluid to determine the level.

“The advantage of capacitive level sensors is that they can be used for basically any solid and liquid. They have no moving parts and scales incredibly easy. They make no contact to the liquid or solid being measured, and so can also be used for more corrosive liquids. The disadvantage is that they need to be calibrated for the liquid being measured. The capacitive level sensor has the 2 conducting plates in the form of 2 electrically isolated aluminium tubes, a smaller tube in a larger tube. The space between the tubes is the dielectric. When the tube is empty, the space is occupied by air. when the tube starts to fill, more and more of the space will be occupied by water. Water holds more charge than air and thus the capacitance will rise (mostly) linearly with the water level. “

 


October 16, 2014

DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project

at 1:46 am. Filed under DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project

 

Our friends over at Electro Labs has a new project out, it is a DIY LM1876 Audio Amplifier Project. As usual it is a start to finish project that has full details so you can build your own.

“This is an audio power amplifier based on LM1876 which can deliver up to 20W per channel into 4 or 8 ohm load and guarantees less than 0.1% THD + N (Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise).

The amplifier is powered by -15 0 15 VAC symmetrical supply. The full bridge diode rectifier and the smoothing capacitors convert the AC input to ±21 VDC which is used to power LM1876. The inductors on the AC input line reduces the noise arising from the mains line.”

October 13, 2014

blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer

at 9:53 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

blueShift - An OpenXC LED Tachometer

 

Inside the custom 3D printed housing Pete Mills built a LED Tachometer which gets engine data from a Open XC ODB2 module via bluetooth. It is looking for RPM and headlight status data from the module to update the user display. The headlamp status is used to dim the LED display when the headlights are automatically turned on by the car.

“An Arduino, some addressable LED’s, a bluetooth module, code and a 3D printer come together to make blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer.  blueShift is so named for the Bluetooth protocol used for data communication, and the use of a tachometer to indicate when to shift your car.”

 


October 9, 2014

Robo-Dog made from Scrap Electronics

at 3:24 pm. Filed under DIY Hacks

Robo-Dog made from Scrap Electronics

 

At a glance this Robo Dog by  looks like something you might find in the toy section of your local department store. Check out the parts below that went into the building of it.

“I used the following materials (probably you can easily find better materials and substitutes):

  • 1 broken mouse (it doesn’t matter where you are; you can always find a broken mouse. Or you can “accidentally” break one.)
  • 1 gearbox (with motor) from a toy. I used the one from a cheap toy weapon. You can use the one from a toy car with good traction.
  • 4 black keys from an ABANDONED AND BROKEN piano. Not the one from your mother in law, not the one from the museum, not the one from the restaurant (just in case, run when you get them)
  • 2 small gears or plastic discs
  • 2 small metallic angles
  • 1 small spring (for the tail)
  • 1 switch (you can find one in a broken toy)
  • 2 plastic coathangers
  • Wires
  • Nuts, screws and iron washers
  • Extra plastic and metal trash
  • Superglue
  • Soldering tin
  • 2 AA batteries
  • 1 AA batteries holder (if you are lucky enough, your can use the one from the toy)”

 

October 5, 2014

Plot Clock

at 11:57 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This is a cool plot clock made by Francisco Ramos Muñoz. It uses 3 mini servo motors, one to move the draw/erase mechanism up and down and two to move the print location. The lines are nice and straight so we can tell that some kinematic techniques have been employed here. The system is being controlled using an Arduino microcontroller and is sure entertaining to watch. If you are interested in making your own you can find the instructions here.

 

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