Hacked Gadgets Forum

August 20, 2015

DIY Speaker

at 8:50 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

DIY Speaker_3

 

There are easier things to make than a DIY speaker but the essential pieces of a speaker are able to be cobbled together in your workshop. It may not sound better than a $5 store bought one but at least you can say you built it with your own hands in your workshop. As Gursimran Singh mentions you might need a small amplifier to get a bit more volume out of the device but the feeling of accomplishment should give you a nice glow that the sound you are hearing is coming from a device that was built using your hands from some scrap parts.

“For this to be made we need:

  1. A cup made of paper in the last second step I would explain you to make it when not having a paper cup.
  2. Insulated copper wire (take it from old cfl or from ting-tong bell)
  3. Magnet(we can get it easily from market)
  4. AUX cable
  5. AUX cable port(get it from old radio)
  6. Duct tape
  7. Paper Sheets.”

 

DIY Speaker_2

 

 

 DIY Speaker_1

 


August 17, 2015

DIY Car Compass

at 11:19 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

DIY Car Compass

 

If your car doesn’t show you the direction you are traveling it would be handy to build this DIY Car Compass. DaAwesomeP built this neat device, most cell phones have this capability but it is nice to have a piece of hardware doing the work in a fixed location. A Pro Mini is used to read in position data from a magnetometer and then output the results on a nice OLED display.

Via: Arduino Forum

“Parts:

  • Arduino Pro Mini 328 – 3.3V/8MHz I got the 3.3v version for simplicity of connecting it to the other 3.3v parts (Sparkfun).

  • SparkFun Triple Axis Magnetometer Breakout – HMC5883L This compass breakout can be mounted in any orientation (Sparkfun).

  • SparkFun Micro OLED Breakout This is the screen form the MicroView, but the Arduino + Screen is cheaper than the MicroView and its programmer (Sparkfun).

  • Protoboard It doesn’t matter what you use, but this is what I got (Sparkfun).

  • Power Source I just cut the end off a 30-pin 5v car charger that I had. It was useless and lying around. The Arduino can handle an input from 3.3v to 12v DC.

  • Thin wire You’ll need this to make jumper connections on the perfboard. My was about 24 AUG. I used both stranded and solid wire for different parts.

  • Headers This will make it easy to attach the components to the protoboard.
  • Why no accelerometer? An accelerometer would allow for automatic adjustment of orientation and declination angle, but this is mostly intended to be a more permanent thing, and you can learn about how the declination angle works.”

 

DIY Car Compass_3


August 11, 2015

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips

at 11:51 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, DIY Hacks, Insane Equipment

  DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips_2

 

If you have ever wanted an X-Ray machine in the lab to assist in tracing out the PCB traces that run under components? John McMaster built just that. He used a dental X-Ray machine which has a very small image size. A controller moves the system to allow for multiple images to be taken and stitched together later. The result is demystified reverse engineering. Via: Make

 

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips_3

 

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips

 


August 5, 2015

FPGA-Based Rubik’s Cube Solver

at 2:00 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, DIY Hacks

FPGA-Based Rubik's Cube Solver

 

Alex Whiteway, Sungjoon Park and Rameez Qurashi built a great FPGA-Based Rubik’s Cube Solver. The system uses 3 robotic grippers to manipulate the cube, a camera to “see” what state the cube is in at the beginning and an Altera Nios II FPGA computes how to solve the cube. There are lots of algorithms available, the team looks at many of them and decided to roll their own solution. It isn’t as optimized as some solutions but was one they could code in the time available. The solution the system takes is the 5 step process seen here

“The software consists of code for cube scanning and solving. The cube scanning works by reading in the raw YUV 444 data from a pixel buffer that the Altera IP video cores use to store data our camera and output it to a VGA screen. The scanning code creates 9 lowpass filter kernels at uniform locations corresponding to the expected location of cubies on each face of the cube. We use these filters on each channel of the YUV data. We chose to do this lowpass filtering to mitigate the effect of noise in individual pixels. We then created threshold values to assign a color value to each cubie based on the result of the lowpass filter of each channel. In order to reduce color misidentifications, we take 25 samples of each kernel and use the mode as the final result. For further error-checking, we compare the total amount of color values for each cubie and check it against the total number of colors of each cubie for a normal Rubik’s cube (9/color) and we rescan the cube if these numbers do not match. Because of limitations with our three arm setup only allowing us to scan 4 faces we have to use the arms to creatively rotate certain faces to present all of the cubies to the scanner, slightly scrambling the original cube orientation more in the process. This method will not allow us to present the left and right center cubies, but these are inferred in software. After the cube is finished scanning, it sends the color values of the faces to the cube solving code.”

 

 

FPGA-Based Rubik's Cube Solver_2 

August 3, 2015

Electric Vehicle Kit That Can Be Built in a Week

at 10:04 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

Electric Vehicle Kit That Can Be Built in a Week

 

This The Switch Lab electric vehicle kit is designed for students to build it in a classroom. It comes with everything you need to build a sporty electric vehicle in about one week. The kit starts at around $20K and is designed to be built by one class and then stripped back down for the next class to build. The basic model comes with lead acid batteries, the higher models some with lithium ion batteries. The open chassis design is perfect for learning since there are no body panels to work around and obstruct the important bits that make the vehicle work.

Via: Make 

“The SWITCH Lab was designed to allow the instructor complete flexibility in the classroom. We provide over 30 hours of lecture material and 40 plus hours of lab projects, including the assembly of The SWITCH electric vehicle. Instructors can include our lectures as presented, skip some, augment others, or create their own. The class can be taught as an intense two week summer program or 17 week semester program or anything in between.”

 

 

 


August 1, 2015

DIY WiFi Smoke Detector

at 10:06 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

 

Proto G sent in his latest project. It is a DIY WiFi Smoke Detector that he built to monitor his battery storage area. The system uses IFTTT (If this then that) to send out the messages. A full walk through of the device will be coming soon.

 

July 29, 2015

Circle Plane

at 11:34 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

circle-plane

 

I remember making a hand launched flyer using a straw and 2 circular hoops of paper. This Circle Plane when scaled up is very impressive. It doesn’t look all that controllable but the other planes had a blast flying through the large moving target. It was nice that the body and hoop were made out of cheap materials so a bit of destruction was not a big deal.

 

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