Hacked Gadgets Forum

August 27, 2014

ABB Robot made of LEGO

at 1:01 am. Filed under Crazy Hacks, What Were They Thinking

ABB Robot made of LEGO

 

Computer engineer Lassee Laussen and software engineer Ken Madsen built this ABB Robot made of LEGO bricks. It was an 8 month build to recreate the complex 6 axis machine. If you are interested in seeing some other interesting projects from Lassee and Ken have a look at Brick It.

“The LEGO version of the IRB 120 is so accurate that it mimics every shape and curve. It also has all 6 axes for the same freedom of movement that the real thing has. Sure, it won’t be moving as quickly as the original or carry the same payloads, but nonetheless it is a pretty spectacular recreation of an industrial robot that finds itself in assembly and pick-and-place operations in factories all over the world.”

 

 


June 25, 2014

Sparkfun’s 6th Annual Autonomous Vehicle Competition

at 7:48 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Crazy Hacks, DIY Hacks

 

Sparkfun organized a day of Autonomous Vehicle fun at their Annual Autonomous Vehicle Competition.

Via: Hackaday

Ground Vehicle Classes

Each entrant will be classified by the judges as one of the following robot classes for their ground vehicle:

  • Micro/PBR – Less than $350 total spent, or small enough to fit into box that’s 10″x6″x4″
  • Doping Class – Bring the biggest, baddest and most expensive vehicle you can make ($1k+ or 25lbs+)
  • Non-Traditional Locomotion – Have a walker? A modified autonomous self-balancing pogostick, motorized hamster ball? This designation is for you.
  • Peloton – All remaining vehicles that don’t fit into any other class

 

Aerial Vehicle Classes

Your entry will fall into one of two categories for the aerial portion of the competition:

  • Fixed Wing – All traditional airplanes, or any vehicle with a fixed wing setup.
  • Rotating Wing – Quadcopters, helicopters, and other contraptions with rotating wings.”

 


June 24, 2014

Bipedal Walking Sentinel Project

at 11:03 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Crazy Hacks

Bipedal Walking Sentinel Project

 

This is a work in progress by Ye Guan, his Bipedal Walking Sentinel Project is a work in progress but the goal is challenging and Ye is making good strides towards a functional walking robot so far. What he is going for is a robot that looks something like the sentinel walker from Warhammer 40k and the two legged walker from Star Wars.

” The robot will have a complete compliment of sensors to help it understand its surrounding and its own condition. The current design uses a total of seven sensors.  For external obstacle avoidance there is a sonar sensor to detect long range surroundings, and an inferred distance sensor pointed down to detect the surface conditions for the robot’s next step. The sonar will allow the robot to detect and walk around large obstacles while the inferred sensor allows the robot to accommodate for changing road conditions, such as stairs. Two pressure sensors will be built into each foot to detect when the foot is on the ground. A gyroscope/accelerometer will be mounted in the head of the robot to inform the robot changes in its orientation and balance so it can adjust itself before falling. A photo detectors will tell the robot to turn on its head lights when there is a lack of ambient lighting. Finally temperature sensors will be added to make sure the system do not overheat, especially with the batteries and microcontrollers in such close proximity due to the space constraints. The entire system will be controlled through a Arduino Mega 2560 microcontroller mounted in the robot’s head.”

 

 

Bipedal Walking Sentinel Project_2


May 29, 2014

Electromagnetic Boots for Walking on the Ceiling

at 12:49 pm. Filed under Crazy Hacks

Electromagnetic Boots for Walking on the Ceiling

 

There will come a time when you have too much electronic junk laying about ready to take apart such that you can’t easily walk around. The obvious solution is to make some Electromagnetic Boots for Walking on the Ceiling.

Via:  Hackaday

“The magnet shoes themselves are easy to make and i can see people trying this. The tricky part is walking upside down, the ropes which have switches on to release the foot you need to step with also provide a way of reaching your leg back up because unlike walking normally your feet are trying to go over your head and not onto the surface in front of you. I tried to not have these but as soon as you release one foot you pivot?swing backwards on the fixed shoe as your centre of gravity shifts, once this has happened your other leg is no longer long enough to step back down so you have to pull you whole body weight up on the one leg which is VERY HARD.”

 

 

May 17, 2014

Maker Faire 2014

at 11:59 am. Filed under Crazy Hacks

Maker Faire 2014

 

I will have to make it out to a Maker Faire one of these days. Looks like a blast and they keep getting bigger and bigger! Thanks to Matt Walsh, Rachel Lea Fox, Anouk Wipprecht and Brice Arnold for the cool footage.

 

 

 

 

 

 


April 30, 2014

Pyro Board – 2D Rubens’ Tube

at 11:21 pm. Filed under Crazy Hacks

Pyro Board - 2D Rubens' Tube_2

 

We have all seen what a Ruben’s Tube looks like, check out the Pyro Board which is a 2D version of that. It has two speakers instead of the normal one.  The results are impressive when a sign wave is pumped into the board but when some music is played the effects are very memorizing. I think this is the modern version of watching a campfire.

 Thanks for the tip John.

 

Pyro Board - 2D Rubens' Tube_3  Pyro Board - 2D Rubens' Tube

 

March 28, 2014

Kyub – Three-Dimensional Feather Touch MIDI Keyboard

at 8:25 pm. Filed under Crazy Hacks

Kyub - Three-Dimensional Feather Touch MIDI Keyboard

 

Check out the Kyub, it is a Three-Dimensional Feather Touch MIDI Keyboard. It is brought to us by the same inventor that made the servoelectric guitar that we featured in the past.

“The Kyub is a maker friendly, open source MIDI keyboard that provides a new window to musical performance. Capacitive sensing gives the Kyub extremely sensitive action and an internal accelerometer allows the volume of each note to be precisely controlled for versatile musical expression. You can attach multiple Kyubs to a computer synthesizer or digital audio workstation for solo play, jamming with friends, or composition. A computer with a synthesizer program is required to make music,  Almost any computer-based synthesizer can be used–we provide information on connecting the Kyub to the free demo version of Propellerhead Reason which provides access to hundreds of high quality sounds.”

 

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