Hacked Gadgets Forum

October 21, 2014

Halloween UFO Project

at 2:57 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets

 

People who visit the house of Andrew Wyatt will have a surprise when they see his Halloween UFO Project! It comes to life using cardboard, tape, tinfoil, 8mm Diffused neopixels from Adafruit and an Arduino.

 


October 13, 2014

blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer

at 9:53 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

blueShift - An OpenXC LED Tachometer

 

Inside the custom 3D printed housing Pete Mills built a LED Tachometer which gets engine data from a Open XC ODB2 module via bluetooth. It is looking for RPM and headlight status data from the module to update the user display. The headlamp status is used to dim the LED display when the headlights are automatically turned on by the car.

“An Arduino, some addressable LED’s, a bluetooth module, code and a 3D printer come together to make blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer.  blueShift is so named for the Bluetooth protocol used for data communication, and the use of a tachometer to indicate when to shift your car.”

 


October 7, 2014

Acoustic Impulse Marker

at 4:11 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

Acoustic Impulse Marker

 

This Acoustic Impulse Marker project by Adam Wrobel and Michael Grisanti of Cornell University uses 3 microphones to listen for sharp sounds, when a sound is detected the arrival time of the sound to each of the 3 microphones is used to determine where the sound came from. The project uses a ATmega 1284p microcontroller to process the microphone input but analog stages are used to convert a fast rising edge noise into a digital input for the microcontroller to work with easier.

“The core of our system is hardware based analog circuit, which filters, amplifies, and processes the sounds obtained from the microphones. By utilizing hardware for this, we are able to high frequency signal processing without taxing the microcontroller. Also, we remove the need to use the relatively slow ADC of the microcontroller by processing all the analog signals in hardware and converting them to binary digital pulses. However, the main tradeoff here is that the analog hardware limited our accuracy in a way that is very difficult to measure. Every stage of the circuit has real world inefficiencies and tolerances, which could accumulate in minute error. No matter how fast or thorough our software system is, it can only work with the values received from the analog hardware.”

 


October 5, 2014

Plot Clock

at 11:57 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This is a cool plot clock made by Francisco Ramos Muñoz. It uses 3 mini servo motors, one to move the draw/erase mechanism up and down and two to move the print location. The lines are nice and straight so we can tell that some kinematic techniques have been employed here. The system is being controlled using an Arduino microcontroller and is sure entertaining to watch. If you are interested in making your own you can find the instructions here.

 

October 2, 2014

Etch a Sketch Clock

at 5:49 am. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

 

This Etch a Sketch Clock is a great use of an old toy!

“I use an Arduino driving two very cheap darlington stepper drivers with 64:1 internally reduced steppers for the drawing. For the rotation I’m using an Easy-Driver driving a Nema 17 stepper.

I also have a DS1307RTC real time clock installed so it always knows the time. Setting the time is a one-off via USB connected to a PC. Once done, you un-tether, and then the RTC keeps the time, for up to a year on the rechargeable battery, or so I’m told…”

 


September 27, 2014

Murata Cheerleaders

at 1:56 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks, Insane Equipment

 murata_cheerleaders

 

Murata is always pushing the envelope when it comes to demonstrating their technology in action. You probably remember the close up look we got of the technology behind Murata Girl and Murata Boy. This time they have made an entire group of robotic cheerleaders who dance in formation. They sit on top of a ball and balance as they are moving around. We have seen balancing ball robots before but the complexity of moving all of these balancing robots in unison must be quite challenging.

You need to see them in action. Click here to see the video, scroll down to see how the technology comes together.

Thanks to Amy from Murata for the info.

 

 

September 24, 2014

Realtime GPS Vehicle Tracking Sends Data using GSM

at 7:19 pm. Filed under Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

conjunto_gps_small 

 

If you like the idea of having a GPS tracking device in your car to monitor the actual location of it there are some devices that you can simply purchase like the  SilverCloud we saw before. But if you like to build things yourself have a look at the Realtime GPS Vehicle Tracking device that Sends Data using GSM by the guys over at Cooking Hacks. Not sure what this has to do with cooking but I am not one to talk…

“It will send you an SMS with the location, longitude and latitude at the moment, and it also sends GPS data to a web server with the realtime position (Google Maps). Thanks to the GPS+GPRS shield you can track your car in realtime. This shield is programmed to recognise your number and only if it is correct it will send you this data.”

 

 

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