Hacked Gadgets Forum

August 27, 2015

Dobot – Robotic Arm

at 10:38 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks

 

The Dobot is an interesting robotic arm platform that has lots of cool uses.

“The High Accuracy how easy for our M-1X to carry the small screwdrivers with full accurate strikes! Various Controlling Methods it could be controlled by via 6 ways including mouse, mobile APP, EEG, voice, leap motion and gestures. M-1X can read It support the VI system. Red or green? You decide! “

 


August 13, 2015

Hackers Remotely Hack into Vehicle

at 10:23 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Crazy Hacks

 

 Turns out there is a hole in the UConnect entertainment system that can be found in many cars on the road today. This can allow hackers to take control over things like the vehicle systems like acceleration and braking

“Two hackers have developed a tool that can hijack a Jeep over the internet. WIRED senior writer Andy Greenberg takes the SUV for a spin on the highway while the hackers attack it from miles away.”

 


August 11, 2015

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips

at 11:51 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, DIY Hacks, Insane Equipment

  DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips_2

 

If you have ever wanted an X-Ray machine in the lab to assist in tracing out the PCB traces that run under components? John McMaster built just that. He used a dental X-Ray machine which has a very small image size. A controller moves the system to allow for multiple images to be taken and stitched together later. The result is demystified reverse engineering. Via: Make

 

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips_3

 

DIY X-Ray Inspector Looks Inside Chips

 


August 5, 2015

FPGA-Based Rubik’s Cube Solver

at 2:00 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, DIY Hacks

FPGA-Based Rubik's Cube Solver

 

Alex Whiteway, Sungjoon Park and Rameez Qurashi built a great FPGA-Based Rubik’s Cube Solver. The system uses 3 robotic grippers to manipulate the cube, a camera to “see” what state the cube is in at the beginning and an Altera Nios II FPGA computes how to solve the cube. There are lots of algorithms available, the team looks at many of them and decided to roll their own solution. It isn’t as optimized as some solutions but was one they could code in the time available. The solution the system takes is the 5 step process seen here

“The software consists of code for cube scanning and solving. The cube scanning works by reading in the raw YUV 444 data from a pixel buffer that the Altera IP video cores use to store data our camera and output it to a VGA screen. The scanning code creates 9 lowpass filter kernels at uniform locations corresponding to the expected location of cubies on each face of the cube. We use these filters on each channel of the YUV data. We chose to do this lowpass filtering to mitigate the effect of noise in individual pixels. We then created threshold values to assign a color value to each cubie based on the result of the lowpass filter of each channel. In order to reduce color misidentifications, we take 25 samples of each kernel and use the mode as the final result. For further error-checking, we compare the total amount of color values for each cubie and check it against the total number of colors of each cubie for a normal Rubik’s cube (9/color) and we rescan the cube if these numbers do not match. Because of limitations with our three arm setup only allowing us to scan 4 faces we have to use the arms to creatively rotate certain faces to present all of the cubies to the scanner, slightly scrambling the original cube orientation more in the process. This method will not allow us to present the left and right center cubies, but these are inferred in software. After the cube is finished scanning, it sends the color values of the faces to the cube solving code.”

 

 

FPGA-Based Rubik's Cube Solver_2 

August 3, 2015

Electric Vehicle Kit That Can Be Built in a Week

at 10:04 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, DIY Hacks, Electronic Hacks

Electric Vehicle Kit That Can Be Built in a Week

 

This The Switch Lab electric vehicle kit is designed for students to build it in a classroom. It comes with everything you need to build a sporty electric vehicle in about one week. The kit starts at around $20K and is designed to be built by one class and then stripped back down for the next class to build. The basic model comes with lead acid batteries, the higher models some with lithium ion batteries. The open chassis design is perfect for learning since there are no body panels to work around and obstruct the important bits that make the vehicle work.

Via: Make 

“The SWITCH Lab was designed to allow the instructor complete flexibility in the classroom. We provide over 30 hours of lecture material and 40 plus hours of lab projects, including the assembly of The SWITCH electric vehicle. Instructors can include our lectures as presented, skip some, augment others, or create their own. The class can be taught as an intense two week summer program or 17 week semester program or anything in between.”

 

 

 


July 27, 2015

Replica of Batman Returns Batmobile

at 12:19 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, What Were They Thinking

batman-returns-batmobile (1)

 

If you like movie cars have a look at this one. Not sure it would fit in the garage but it would be fun to drive around town!

Via: TechEBlog

“Special crime fighting gadgets include a fully operational flame thrower at the rear, hydraulic suspension enabling the car to be lifted a further nine inches off the ground, a smoke release mechanism, remote full releasing electronic canopy, remote ignition and full LED running lights, dashboard display and front and rear camera’s complete the specification. This vehicle is believed to be one of the best after-production, fully road-legal models ever made. The mileage is particularly low as it has mainly been transported from venue to venue and is described by the vendor as in excellent running order”

 

July 17, 2015

Opening Garage Doors in Seconds using the De Bruijn Sequence

at 10:53 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Crazy Hacks

nyan

 

Many garage door openers are not very secure but there are still thousands of codes that need to be transmitted. If these codes were being entered manually it would take a long time to go through all the possibilities but of course we could just use a small processor to run through the combinations. Samy used a kids toy that had all the required hardware to do the task, this could have also been done with a dev board and a small display and a transmitter but it wouldn’t have looked as cool.

The really interesting thing that Samy discovered was how the garage openers look for valid codes, it isn’t a unique entry that is tested. For example if enter the wrong 4 digit code into your home alarm system you would need to wait till it timed out or press a clear key before you attempt a new code. This is not the case with these garage door systems. It just looks at the last X number of bit sequences. The De Bruijn Sequence (here is an online generator to play with) ensures that all sequences can be found within the stream of characters but not in order. This means that the actual amount of data that was needed to be transmitted was less than 5% of the entire regular bruit force test suite.

 

 

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