Hacked Gadgets Forum

December 13, 2014

Internet Controlled Robots

at 2:34 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 Internet Controlled Robots_2

 

These Internet Controlled Robots are not available to play with all the time but if you keep an eye on the Twitter channel you will have a chance to have a look and give them a try when they are online next.

“I only put together one robot kit previously, then these two robots both started as Activity Bots.
I hooked up a Raspberry Pi with an HD camera, went through a few wifi options, and got the robot to stream video to twitch.tv and take commands from users via their chat. Later i added the Aruduino for using neopixels and some other future features. We’ve also been making dungeons around the house, made out of cardboard, making quests, and other things for people to do and explore.”

 

Internet Controlled Robots


November 18, 2014

Self-Balancing Raleigh Chopper

at 3:36 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

 Self-balancing Raleigh Chopper

 

It isn’t a simply task to make a self balancing anything. But if you are thinking of taking on the challenge has documented his design details for this Self-Balancing Raleigh Chopper that could give you a head start.

 

“Data from the IMU is read by the Arduino Mega 1280. I use a Mega 1280 because they are a lot cheaper online than the 2560, and about the same price as an Uno. They have several hard wired serial outputs which means I can conveniently use one of these to send motor control data to the Sabertooth 2 x 25 Amp power controller, and another to send data to the serial-LCD screen. The Deadman switch and steering buttons (actually brake levers from children’s e-scooters) when pressed will connect their respective Mega pins to ground. The deadman is for safety, if you let go of it all power to the motors will stop after half a second. Digital Pin 12 is connected to an LED. This LED stays lit on startup and goes out after a few seconds when the machine is ready to be brought “level” at which point it will start to balance itself. The potentiometer in the diagram is actually on the left handlebar and is a Magura 5K potentiometer “twist-grip” throttle handle designed for electric vehicles. Turning it makes the machine lean forwards a little, and so it starts to roll forwards. Let it spring back and machine will lean backwards a little and slow down. It makes a very effective method of controlling speed (as well as simply leaning like you would on a Segway).”

 


November 6, 2014

EWaste 3DPrinter

at 10:53 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks

EWaste 3DPrinter

 

If you think the price of 3D printers is hitting the floor check out what built for $60. About 80% of this EWaste 3DPrinter is recycled computer parts which is abundant and readily available.

“First of all, we learn how a generic CNC system works (by assembling and calibrating bearings, guides and threads) and then teach the machine to respond to g-code instructions. After that, we add a small plastic extruder and give an overview on plastic extrusion calibration, driver power tuning and other few operations that will bring the printer to life. Following this instructions you will get a small footprint 3D Printer that is built with about an 80% of recycled components, which gives it a great potential and helps to reduce the cost significantly.”

 


November 2, 2014

Tiny Thermal Imaging Device

at 9:18 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, DIY Hacks

Tiny Thermal Imaging Device

 

Mike Harrison from Mike’s Electric Stuff shows off how he used a small thermal imaging sensor and incorporated it into a custom little project with a iPod Nano screen. With a tiny bit of polish this thing would be a great product on any hardware store shelf!

 

November 1, 2014

$100 DIY Car Computer

at 11:31 pm. Filed under Complex Hacks, Computer Hacks, Cool Gadgets, DIY Hacks

 

If you need some computing power on the go you might want to look into adding a car computer. Sentdex shows us how he does it on the cheap, the top of the great find is the $17 monitor. It has a Raspberry Pi as the heart, an ODB interface and a camera to loop record. An interesting power management system allows the system to detect when car power has been switched off and gracefully shut down the system.

Via: Hack a Day


September 27, 2014

Murata Cheerleaders

at 1:56 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Electronic Hacks, Insane Equipment

 murata_cheerleaders

 

Murata is always pushing the envelope when it comes to demonstrating their technology in action. You probably remember the close up look we got of the technology behind Murata Girl and Murata Boy. This time they have made an entire group of robotic cheerleaders who dance in formation. They sit on top of a ball and balance as they are moving around. We have seen balancing ball robots before but the complexity of moving all of these balancing robots in unison must be quite challenging.

You need to see them in action. Click here to see the video, scroll down to see how the technology comes together.

Thanks to Amy from Murata for the info.

 

 

September 18, 2014

MIT Cheetah Robot

at 6:20 am. Filed under Complex Hacks, Cool Gadgets, Insane Equipment

MIT Cheetah Robot_4

 

The MIT Biomimetic Robotics Laboratory has been working hard on the MIT Cheetah Robot. Deborah Ajilo, Negin Abdolrahim Poorheravi,John Patrick Mayo,Justin Cheung, Sangbae Kim, Shinsuk Park, Kathryn L. Evans, Matt Angle, Will Bosworth, Joao Luiz Almeida Souza Ramos, Sehyuk Yim, Albert Wang, Meng Yee Chuah, and Hae Won Park are members of the huge development team. Why so many team members? This is not a simply problem to tackle, as you read through their post you will see that there were a number of challenges that they needed to overcome in the development of the system.

Via: Evan Ackerman at IEEE Spectrum

“Now MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah — a sleek, four-legged assemblage of gears, batteries, and electric motors that weighs about as much as its feline counterpart. The team recently took the robot for a test run on MIT’s Killian Court, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip.

In experiments on an indoor track, the robot sprinted up to 10 mph, even continuing to run after clearing a hurdle. The MIT researchers estimate that the current version of the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

The key to the bounding algorithm is in programming each of the robot’s legs to exert a certain amount of force in the split second during which it hits the ground, in order to maintain a given speed: In general, the faster the desired speed, the more force must be applied to propel the robot forward. Sangbae Kim, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, hypothesizes that this force-control approach to robotic running is similar, in principle, to the way world-class sprinters race.”

 

MIT Cheetah Robot_1

 

MIT Cheetah Robot_2

 

MIT Cheetah Robot_3

 

 

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