Hacked Gadgets Forum

October 25, 2014

LG Flatron W2052TQ Monitor Teardown and Repair

at 1:43 am. Filed under Teardown

LG_FLATRON_W2052TQ_MONITOR_8570

 

After about 3 or so years my 3 20 inch LG Flatron W2052TQ monitors started failing. They were continuously powered on for their entire life and would simply go into sleep mode when the computers weren’t in use. You can see the repair video below that shows the 2 1000uF caps that were the culprit. At this time I have still to crack open the other 2 monitors but they were showing the same symptoms so I am sure the same 2 caps have also failed in them. When they were powered on they would come out of sleep mode with no issues and work fine, the issue was if they were ever unplugged and allowed to power down completely. The power on button would need to be pressed many time or the power cord would need to be plugged and unplugged many times over and over to get the panel to liven up. In the end they just didn’t turn on or they would just turn on for 10s of seconds before the panel just went black.

The teardown shows what I consider very poor build techniques. First of all the entire monitor is held together with plastic snap together construction. I would have loved to see some screws holding things together allowing it to be serviced easier. But what I was very surprised at was how the electronics cage was just floating inside the box. There is a bit of tape holding it in place and a few tabs on the base plate bracket. In the video at around the 25 minute mark you can see a poorly designed PCB mounting design. I could see this passing as OK if they were making a few hundred of these but I am thinking they make hundreds of thousands of these monitors.

You can see many pictures below, full res images can be found here.

LG I think your quality needs to be improved!

 

 

LG_FLATRON_W2052TQ_MONITOR_8631

 

 


 

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14 Responses to “LG Flatron W2052TQ Monitor Teardown and Repair”

  1. Annie Says:

    Typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets. Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies. Many get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

  2. Ty Tower Says:

    I’ve had similar problems with a couple of my monitors and just chucked them out with only a quick glance inside if at all. Thanks Alan, I’ll look more closely next time . Chucked a $1000 TV just a month ago which I should have looked more closely at then .
    Can you indicate where on the board these capacitors were and what you thought their function was?

  3. Tony Says:

    They’re low-ESR caps in the power supply (I don’t even need to watch the video or look at the pictures to know that… it’s always those.)

    Google ‘capacitor plague’ for the background story.

    If it’s got a switch-mode power supply (everything these days) and it starts acting weird – replace the caps.

    For monitors, the other common failure is the inverter to drive the backlight, easy to get a replacement & install it.

  4. Alan Parekh Says:

    If you look at the video at around 14:10 you can see the caps that were replaced. They are most likely 5 volt rail filter caps.

  5. Trav Says:

    Had the very same issue on some Dell monitors. worked fine until powered off, then would not power back up. Same thing, Bad caps..

  6. Annie Says:

    This is typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets.
    Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies.
    Many electronics, some not so cheap, get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

  7. Annie Says:

    Sometimes my comments are not counted/shows?

    2 Responses to “LG Flatron W2052TQ Monitor Teardown and Repair”

    1.Annie Says:
    October 25th, 2014
    Typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets. Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies. Many get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

    2.Ty Tower Says:
    October 25th, 2014
    I’ve had similar problems with a couple of my monitors and just chucked them out with only a quick glance inside if at all. Thanks Alan, I’ll look more closely next time . Chucked a $1000 TV just a month ago which I should have looked more closely at then .
    Can you indicate where on the board these capacitors were and what you thought their function was?

    3.Alan Parekh Says:
    October 26th, 2014
    If you look at the video at around 14:10 you can see the caps that were replaced. They are most likely 5 volt rail filter caps.

    4.Annie Says:
    October 27th, 2014
    This is typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets.
    Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies.
    Many electronics, some not so cheap, get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

  8. Annie Says:

    Sometimes my comments are not counted/shows?

    2 Responses to “LG Flatron W2052TQ Monitor Teardown and Repair”

    1.Annie Says:
    October 25th, 2014
    Typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets. Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies. Many get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

    2.Ty Tower Says:
    October 25th, 2014
    I’ve had similar problems with a couple of my monitors and just chucked them out with only a quick glance inside if at all. Thanks Alan, I’ll look more closely next time . Chucked a $1000 TV just a month ago which I should have looked more closely at then .
    Can you indicate where on the board these capacitors were and what you thought their function was?

    3.Alan Parekh Says:
    October 26th, 2014
    If you look at the video at around 14:10 you can see the caps that were replaced. They are most likely 5 volt rail filter caps.

    4.Annie Says:
    October 27th, 2014
    This is typical building techniques and quality for monitors and small TV sets.
    Blown badcaps is also a common failure in cheap power supplies.
    Many electronics, some not so cheap, get trown away only for a few cents worth of caps.

  9. Alan Parekh Says:

    Hi Annie,

    Sometimes comments get flagged for manual approval.

  10. Derek Tombrello Says:

    As a TV technician, blown capacitors account for nearly 90% of all repairs that I do on customer’s units. The capacitor’s ratings are typically too close to the voltages applied to them. e.g. on 12v supplies, I often see 16v capacitors. Those caps need to be 25v to allow for variances. Anything to save a penny – same goes for the lack of screws seen in this particular model. meh… Makes for easy repairs for us technicians 🙂

  11. Annie Says:

    @Alan Parekh I see, I wonder what got me flagged, maybe “blown”

    @Derek Tombrello True, not only for TV anything that has a SMPS tend to have under rated electrolytic caps even those laptop “bricks” chargers.

  12. Annie Says:

    And they always seam to be as close as possible to a heat source, be it a power resistor or heatsink, to accelerate their demise 🙂

  13. Derek Tombrello Says:

    Planned obsolescence 😉

  14. Annie Says:

    Sometimes they even put 85C where it should be 105C. In the old days there was only the lower temperature variant, except in some exotic applications. Makes me wonder if it’s true or just a big lie since any no name company makes cheap caps that blow or drie up in no time.

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